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T: 01452 385435   E: info@ge-trust.org.uk

Providing grants from funds generated by the
Landfill Communities Fund for the benefit of Gloucestershire

Projects > Keynes Country Park, Cirencester

Improvement works to footpath around the top lake

Posted: 8th June 2006

Funding: £11,000
Scheme Type: Normal Grants
Project Type: Community Open Spaces
Area: Cotswold District Council

Keynes Country Park, Spratsgate Lane, Shorncote, Cirencester, Gloucestershire, GL7 6DF

In November 2005, the Cotswold Water Park Society began planning for a project to undertake capital works to improve and enhance footpaths and interpretation around Keynes Country Park. The Gloucestershire Environmental Trust contributed over £11,000 to the £45,000 project to make the entire circular route around Lake 31, or 'top lake' as it is known, accessible to all park users.

The initial stages of the project involved the creation of 50 metres of new footpath to complete the circuit of the lake. Further work was also undertaken to remodel and landscape the existing path to remedy erosion problems, provide better access for anglers, and to enhance a notoriously narrow section of the footpath around the lake by reforming access points to create much gentler gradients and provide an access ramp suitable for wheelchairs.

The works have radically improved the path's surface making access easier for all, including wheelchair users, and parents with buggies. In addition, a new series of themed interpretation boards were designed as part of a themed way-marked route around the lake. The boards tell the story of the creation of the gravel deposits that lie within the Cotswold Water Park, the history of the area, mineral extraction and the creation of the country park for people and wildlife.

The re-landscaping of the lake's shoreline, with the addition of native wetland plants has also stabilised the shore edge, improving the views and greatly benefiting the huge variety of wildlife including fish and dragonflies which inhabit the lake edge.

Website: www.waterpark.org